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Harvard admits majority nonwhite freshman class

Harvard’s incoming class of students, most of which will graduate in 2021, is majority nonwhite. 

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Of the students admitted from minority groups, 22.2 percent are Asian, 14.6 percent are African-American, 11.6 percent are Latino and 2.5 percent are Native American or Pacific Islander, according to Harvard, putting the percentage of minority students at approximately 50.8 -- slightly more than half of all incoming freshmen.

Conflicting reports claim the class may or may not be the Ivy League university’s first majority nonwhite group in nearly 400 years.

But a 2016 report by the Harvard Gazette showed last year’s incoming class to be 51.4 percent nonwhite.

Admissions data on Harvard’s website show only 16.5 percent of students for the class of 2021 come from New England. More than 15 percent of the people admitted come from the Pacific U.S., 18.7 percent of incoming freshman come from the South and 21.3 percent come from the Middle Atlantic. Twelve percent of the class come from international locations.  

Nearly 40,000 people applied for admittance to Harvard for the 2017-2018 school year. Just over 2,000 were admitted.

>> Related: ‘Blackish’ actress Yara Shahidi announces she's attending Harvard University

According to the Los Angeles Times, at least two other Ivy League schools, Princeton and Cornell, also offered admission to majority nonwhite students.

>> Related: Malia Obama decides which Ivy League college she'll attend

Last week, the New York Times reported that the Trump administration plans to reexamine affirmative action admissions policies at American colleges and universities that may discriminate against white applicants.

Megachurch pastors Joel and Victoria Osteen criticized for throwing ‘Hook ‘Em’ hand sign

Thousands of students graduated this past weekend from the University of Texas at Austin, flooding social media with photos of proud new alumni and their families.

>> Read more trending news 

For most parents, documenting the occasion with a photo means throwing up the “Hook ’em Horns” hand sign, too, usually without much fuss. But when your parents are the first couple of televangelism, a spirited hand gesture can take on a whole other meaning. 

>> Photos: Longhorns arriving for UT graduation ceremony May 20 

Joel Osteen and his wife, Victoria, draw thousands every week to their massive Lakewood Church in Houston, and millions tune in from across the globe to watch. The pair also head a massive multi-million dollar empire stemming from book deals and tours. Their son, Jonathan, recently graduated from UT, and he posed with each of his parents for a pretty common photo taken during commencement weekend: the graduate and his mom and dad both making the “Hook ’em Horns” hand sign. 

14-year-old graduates from college with physics degree

Last week, 14-year-old Carson Huey-You became Texas Christian University’s youngest graduate, earning a bachelor of science degree in physics and minors in math and Chinese.

His mother, Claretta Kimp, said he started learning calculus when he was 3, and she credits her availability as a stay-at-home mother, as well as TCU’s community of faculty and teachers, to her oldest son’s achievements.

“It feels like it was meant to be he would come here,” senior associate dean Dr. Magnus Rittby said of Carson. “There are a lot of reasons why it was successful, and I think it’s very hard not to love Carson and the person he is. He’s not some abrasive kid who think he’s smarter than everyone else, but actually, he is smarter than everyone else.”

Carson enrolled at TCU when he was 11

“When I used to get bad test scores or something like that, I would go home and be disappointed and think about, ‘Oh, I should have known this, I should have done way better,’” he told the Star-Telegram.

Now, he’s learned how to react to an unexpected result.

“I know better how to deal with that disappointment, knowing that I will bounce back,” he said.

Carson’s aptitude for subatomic particles and learning will continue this fall, when he will return to TCU to pursue his master’s degree. The young scholar hopes to eventually earn a Ph.D. and teach in the field.

>> Related: Move over, Mozart! History’s newest premiere pianists are among us, and they’re in Houston

Genius seems to be a family affair: His 11-year-old brother, Cannan, is set to join Carson at TCU this fall, studying for a degree in astronomy.

While the curriculum and environment of college can be quite adult, the boys’ advisers and mother are dedicated to providing the boys with opportunities to be young.

>> Related: Texas lawmakers want you to be able to get your bachelor’s degree at community colleges

“This is where they can continue to learn and grow physically, spiritually, emotionally in every aspect of which your child needs to grow,” Kimp said of TCU’s investment in hers sons. “They don’t feel like, ‘Oh, I’m in a school with a bunch of grown-ups,’ and everything. They feel more like, ‘Hey, this is my family. This is my team. These are the people who really care about me.’”

“TCU is where I’ve grown up,” Carson said. “It’s home.”

Lil Wayne’s daughter to attend Clark Atlanta University

It appears that the daughter of rapper Lil Wayne and his ex, Toya Wright, is set to attend Clark Atlanta University in the fall. 

>> Read more trending news 

Reginae Carter posted a photo on Instagram Monday night of her and Wright standing in front of a CAU sign with the caption, “Mama, we made it.” Wright posted the same photo, writing, “Proud moments.” 

The university posted the photo to social media shortly after, seemingly welcoming Carter to the “#PantherPride Class of 2021” in the fall. 

While a CAU spokesman confirmed that the information in its post is accurate, the school would not confirm outright that Carter will attend school in the fall. But it sure looks like it.

Carter is no stranger to the spotlight. Her birthday celebration at an Atlanta venue was shown on MTV’s “Super Sweet 16” in 2015, an occasion during which her parents gave the homeschooled 10th grader a Ferrari and a BMW X4. She is on the cast of an Atlanta reality spin-off show set to debut this spring: “Growing Up Hip Hop.”

In November, Carter was in the news for defending her father on Instagram after T.I. insulted Lil Wayne over comments he made about the Black Lives Matter movement.

New Jersey teen accepted into all 8 Ivy League schools

It’s good to be Ifeoma White-Thorpe.

>> Read more trending news 

The Denville, New Jersey, high school senior has been accepted into all eight Ivy League schools plus Stanford.

“Harvard, Yale, Columbia, UPenn, Brown, Cornell, Dartmouth, Princeton and Stanford,” White-Thorpe told WABC-TV.

“I was like, I might as well shoot my shot and apply,” White-Thorpe said.

She told WABC-TV now that she’s been accepted into her dream colleges, the hard part is going to be deciding which one to attend when she graduates in June.

“I got into Harvard early action so I figured I’ll just go there. Then I got into all the others, and I was like, wait now I don’t know where I want to go,” White-Thorpe told WABC-TV.

White-Thorpe enrolled in Advanced Placement classes at Morris Hills High School, where she is the student government president.

“I think my love for poetry and writing just really stood out,” she told WABC-TV.

White-Thorpe wants to study biology and go into the global health business.

“Education is essential for change, and I aspire to be that change,” she said earlier in her high school career

The 17-year-old’s parents said they’ll let her decide which school she wants to attend, and White-Thorpe said she’ll make her decision based on financial aid offerings. 

Trump threatens to revoke federal funds from UC Berkeley after protests

After a night of violent protests on the campus of the University of California, Berkeley against a planned speech from Milo Yiannopoulos, President Donald Trump came down hard on the university.

Via Twitter early Thursday, Trump threatened to withhold federal funding if “UC Berkeley does not allow free speech and practices violence on innocent people with a different point of view.”

“If UC Berkeley does not allow free speech and practices violence on innocent people with a different point of view -- NO FEDERAL FUNDS?” he wrote.

If U.C. Berkeley does not allow free speech and practices violence on innocent people with a different point of view - NO FEDERAL FUNDS?— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) February 2, 2017

The riots Wednesday forced university officials to cancel the speech by Yiannopoulos, who was set to appear as part of a book tour. A self-proclaimed internet troll, Yiannopoulos is also an editor at Breitbart News, the far-right website previously under the leadership of Stephen Bannon, Trump’s chief strategist, who has played a key role in many of the executive orders issued during Trump’s first two weeks in office.

>> Read more trending stories  

Berkeley is the flagship campus of the public University of California system. It received $370 million in federal research funding for the 2015-16 school year, according to the university’s website. It has been known as the home of the Free Speech Movement since the turbulent 1960s.

Yiannopoulos said the protests against his speech at the school were “ironic and sad” and called university students and personnel “no friends to free speech any more.”

School officials canceled the speech after demonstrators threw smoke bombs and flares at buildings. The protests grew violent, with some using baseball bats to smash ATMs. At a nearby Walgreens, demonstrators spray-painted the building with messages including “Kill Fascists” and “Kill Trump.”

Fresh paint at Walgreen's pic.twitter.com/7d2L5XYdLv— Michael Bodley (@michael_bodley) February 2, 2017

The Daily Californian put together our reporters' tweets from the events on campus and throughout the city. https://t.co/Lu2sOcZ1Yc pic.twitter.com/oR9Yd3KeoZ— Daily Californian (@dailycal) February 2, 2017

UC Berkeley released the following statement:

“Amid violence, destruction of property and out of concern for public safety, the University of California Police Department determined that it was necessary to remove Milo Yiannopoulos from the campus and to cancel tonight’s scheduled 8 p.m. performance. “The decision was made at about 6 p.m., two hours before the event, and officers read several dispersal announcements to the crowd of more than 1,500 protesters that had gathered outside of the Martin Luther King Jr. ASUC venue. “We condemn in the strongest possible terms the violence and unlawful behavior that was on display and deeply regret that those tactics will now overshadow the efforts to engage in legitimate and lawful protest against the performer’s presence and perspectives.”

Protests against Trump’s policies, including last Saturday’s massive turnout at airports in multiple major U.S. cities to decry the administration’s immigration ban, have mostly been peaceful. Yiannopoulos said on Facebook of Wednesday’s violence that “the Left is absolutely terrified of free speech and will do literally anything to shut it down.”

“It turns out that the progressive left, the social justice left, the feminist, Black Lives Matter ... the hard left, which has become so utterly anti free speech in the last few years, has taken a turn post Trump's election, where they simply will not allow any speaker on campus ... to have their voice heard,” Yiannopoulos said. “They won't allow students to listen to different points of view ... The fact that on an American college campus -- a place of higher education, a place of learning in America, which I've come to as a visitor from the United Kingdom, where we don't have a First Amendment, hoping that this would be somewhere where you could be, do say anything, where you could express your views, express your opinions ... free from violent responses to political ideas, I thought America was the one place where that could be possible.” 

I was just evacuated from UC Berkeley.Posted by Milo Yiannopoulos on Wednesday, February 1, 2017

Virginia college to build on-campus gun range

Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia, has announced plans to build a $3 million, state-of-the-art gun range on its campus.

>> Read more trending stories 

The university's president, Jerry Falwell, announced the plans Tuesday after the county unanimously approved the proposal. The gun range will sit on a 500-acre plot of campus land and will include a pistol range, three rifle ranges, a police shoot house and skeet and trap shooting.

Falwell discussed the gun range Friday on Fox News' "Fox and Friends."

"We have a mountain on campus, and we thought we'd use it for recreation," Falwell said. "We've been able to avoid a lot of the sexual assault problems that you see at a lot of universities by giving students positive alternatives to keep them busy and to keep them entertained. The shooting range will be part of that."

The gun range won't only be for students at Liberty University but will also be open to members of the community and law enforcement.

The range will be the first National Rifle Association-supported gun range at an American university and the first NCAA-certified outdoor shooting range that can be used for all Olympic shooting sports, according to the university's proposal.

The university hopes to have the range open by Labor Day.

Liberty University Unveils Plan for Outdoor Shooting Complex https://t.co/4uXA8snQ9D— SL4GR (@SL4GR) December 8, 2016

Matthew McConaughey offers college students safe ride home

University of Texas students had been studying for hours when one of Austin's most famous residents showed up in a golf cart.

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Matthew McConaughey volunteered with Meals on Wheels on Thanksgiving and decided to continue doing good deeds during the holiday season by helping out his alma mater.

The Texas college alum joined student volunteers in the SURE Walk program to give those staying late on campus some company on their way home. SURE stands for Students United for Rape Elimination.

The Student Government program at the university offers Longhorns who don't want to walk home alone a male and female companion to walk with. Since its inception, the program has expanded with the help of various other student organizations to multiple locations across the 40 acres and even acquired some wheels to transport students faster.

The school posted a photo of McConaughey driving some students back to their residences.

"Longhorns take care of each other, and it's 'safe' to say Matthew McConaughey agrees," a post of Facebook reads. "Don't forget to use SURE Walk when traveling home late at night; you never know who might pick you up."

SURE Walk operates from 7 p.m. to 2 a.m. Monday through Sunday. SURE Walkers can be requested by phone or email. 

Longhorns take care of each other, and it's 'safe' to say Matthew McConaughey agrees. Don't forget to use SURE Walk when traveling home late at night; you never know who might pick you up! #BeSafe #SafeChatsPosted by The University of Texas Student Government on Monday, November 28, 2016

College professor edits Latina student's essay: 'This is not your language'

A college student said she felt "disrespected and invalidated" when her professor wrote a discriminatory comment while editing an essay the student wrote for class. 

On the paper, she said the professor wrote, "Please go back and indicate where you cut and paste." She also said the professor circled "hence" on the paper and wrote, "This is not your word."

>> Read more trending stories  

Suffolk University senior Tiffany Martínez wrote about her experience in a blog post titled "Academia, Love Me Back" on Thursday. She wrote that the professor "challenged (her) intelligence" in front of other students in her class. 

"This morning, my professor handed me back a paper (a literature review) in front of my entire class and exclaimed 'this is not your language,'" Martínez wrote. "On the top of the page (she) wrote in blue ink: 'Please go back and indicate where you cut and paste.' ... They assumed that the work I turned in was not my own ... On the second page the professor circled the word 'hence' and wrote in between the typed lines 'This is not your word.'" 

I was hurt badly this morning and publicly humiliated in front of my peers by a professor. They assumed I plagiarized my...Posted by Tiffany Corin Martínez on Thursday, October 27, 2016

Martínez told Buzzfeed News that the professor "spoke loudly enough that students at the back of the room heard and asked if (she) was OK after class."

"I spent the rest of the class going back through every single line, every single citation to make sure that nothing had been plagiarized, even though I knew I hadn't," she told Buzzfeed. 

Martínez, a Latina with aspirations of earning a Ph.D and becoming a college professor, wrote that she has battled stereotypes throughout her academic career. She discussed the disappointment she has felt with consistent assumptions that she is "weak, unintelligent and incapable."

"As a minority in my classrooms, I continuously hear my peers and professors use language that both covertly and overtly oppresses the communities I belong to," she wrote. "In the journey to become a successful student, I swallow the 'momentary' pain from these interactions and set my emotions aside so I can function productively as a student."

After Martínez's post gained attention online, Suffolk University president Marisa Kelly released a statement saying the school "must redouble efforts to create a more inclusive environment."

"Suffolk University is committed to making every member of our community feel welcomed, valued and respected," Kelly wrote. "I take (Martínez's) concern seriously on behalf of the institution as the acting president, and I take it seriously as an individual personally committed to diversity and inclusion."

Kelly also announced that faculty members will go through mandatory microagression training sessions on how to better interact with students.

 

In her Momentum blog, Acting President Marisa Kelly addresses the University's commitment to making every member of our...Posted by Suffolk University on Tuesday, November 1, 2016

8-year-old admitted to college after inspiring pep talk

An 8-year-old was offered admission into a Texas university after her mother sent the school a video of the girl.

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Jordin Phipps proudly sported a University of North Texas T-shirt while talking to the camera as her mother recorded her. 

"(I'm going to) start my day in a positive way," Phipps said. "I will be respectful with the words I say. I will pay attention, and I will do my best, and I will study hard for every test."

The motivational pep talk was a presentation of a daily message that Phipps and her classmates at Watson Technology Center in Garland, Texas, recite at school.

"I will take advantage of what my teachers have to give. I will become a productive citizen in this world," Phipps said. "I am smart. I am a leader. Failure is not an option for me. Success is only moments away. I have the attitude of a North Texas eagle."

After seeing the video, UNT officials surprised Phipps at an assembly at her school and awarded her a $10,000 Presidential Excellence award, which is normally given to high school seniors. She was also guaranteed a spot in UNT's class of 2030.

Phipps' mother, Nichole Smith, is a University of North Texas alumna.

MEAN GREEN PRIDE: 8-year-old Jordin is our new favorite person.  Her mom just sent us this adorable and inspiring video of her.  We can't wait to have her on campus!Posted by University of North Texas on Friday, September 23, 2016

SCHOLARSHIP WINNER: Congrats to the latest student admitted to UNT, 8-year-old Jordin!  We got to surprise her today at...Posted by University of North Texas on Thursday, September 29, 2016

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