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Sexual harassment at work can increase risk of eating disorders, drug use for women, study says

Workplace sexual harassment can be detrimental. In fact, those who experience it are more likely to suffer from depression, eating disorders and drug use, according to a new report.

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Researchers from the American Psychological Association recently conducted a study, published in Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, to further explore how enduring sexual harassment can cause psychological harm.

To do so, they surveyed 2,000 Britons. They found that women are more likely than men to report the effects of sexual assault, which could include anxiety, depression, eating disorders, drug and alcohol abuse, post-traumatic stress and a lower level of overall happiness.

Although men may be at a higher risk for mental health issues after experiencing sexual harassment, women are also more likely to report incidents of it. 

Furthermore, researchers found men in the military are 10 times more like to endure sexual harassment, compared with civilian men. However, 81 percent of military men who are harassed keep quiet. 

“Sexual harassment in the workplace is a significant occupational health psychology problem,” APA President Antonio E. Puente said in a statement. “Psychological research has offered understanding into the causes of workplace harassment, as well as some strategies for preventing or reducing it. However, there is limited research regarding the characteristics of harassers, which makes it difficult to predict who will do it and where and when it might happen.”

While the APA acknowledges there is more research to do, it is encouraging organizations to be proactive by establishing policies that prohibit sexual harassment, raising employee awareness and creating reporting procedures.

“Psychology can help, in the form of sexual harassment training,” Puente said, “but it only works if it is part of a comprehensive, committed effort to combat the problem.”

Bodies of rapper Bambino Gold, cousin found, police say

The bodies of an Atlanta rapper and his cousin have been found in Alabama, according to authorities.

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The bodies of Edward Reeves, whose stage name is Bambino Gold, and cousin Kendrick Stokes were found in Macon County, Alabama, the sheriff confirmed.

The bodies were found Friday night and Saturday, according to a report by WTVM , a Columbus television station.

The first body was discovered in a wooded area off County Road 13, according to the report. The second body was found in the woods off Highway 80, about 4 miles from where the first body was found.

Macon County is about 40 miles east of Montgomery.

Reeves, 29, went missing after he and Stokes left Nov. 5 for Montgomery, Channel 2 Action News reported.

The Alabama Bureau of Investigation has taken over the case, WTVM reported.

Reeves has collaborated with rapper Lil Boosie, who is best known for the 2006 hit, “Wipe Me Down.”

Eating too fast could be making you fat, study says

Do you often scarf down your food pretty quickly? Be careful, because doing so could cause some major health issues, according to a new report.

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Researchers from universities in Japan recently conducted an experiment to determine if eating speed can be linked to obesity or metabolic syndrome, a cluster of heart disease, diabetes and stroke risk factors.

To do so, researchers evaluated 642 men and 441 women, around age 50, who did not have metabolic syndrome in 2008. They then divided the participants into three groups based on their usual eating speed: slow, normal or fast.

After five years, they found that those who ate fast were 11.6 percent more likely to have metabolic syndrome. Normal eaters were 6.5 percent more likely, and slow eaters were 2.3 percent more likely. They were also able to associate fast eating with more weight gain, higher blood glucose and larger waistline. 

Why is that?

“Eating more slowly may be a crucial lifestyle change to help prevent metabolic syndrome,” lead author Takayuki Yamaji said in a statement. “When people eat fast they tend not to feel full and are more likely to overeat. Eating fast causes bigger glucose fluctuation, which can lead to insulin resistance. We also believe our research would apply to a U.S. population.”

The findings, which have not been peer-reviewed, were presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions.

Want to learn more about the results? Take a look here

Man beaten, robbed during Plenty of Fish meetup, police say

Online dating turned violent for a man when a woman he met on the dating site Plenty of Fish lured him to a home, where he was beaten and robbed, police said.

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The victim met a woman who goes by the dating profile name StonerSnowBunny91, police said. The two decided to meet in person. When the victim tried to meet up, he told police the address was bogus and said he ended up at an intersection. But a couple of blocks away, he said he saw her standing in front of a home.

According to a police report, when he got inside, there were two other women who took him to a room with a mattress on the floor. One of the women told him she was going to grab a beer and come right back.

Seconds later, police say three men with black shirts over their faces rushed in and slammed the victim to the floor, punching and kicking him. The report said one of the men had a gun, and demanded that the victim empty his pockets and take off all his clothes. The victim complied, but he told police the three men continued beating him, hitting him with a pair of brass knuckles. 

He said the men even threatened to kill him if he didn’t give them the PIN for his debit card. Police say the men covered the victim’s face and put him in a closet. When he was finally freed, the victim says the men gave him his keys and told him “not to call police or they would find him and kill him.” 

The man got into his car, took off and flagged down a person who then called police. When officers got to the home, no one was inside. But police found the victim’s blue Nike shoe and wallet.

Kristen Freese, 19, Elizabeth Rittenhouse, 20, and Darell Mathis, 24 were arrested and charged with armed robbery.

Boy, 10, dies after getting tangled in park swing

A 10-year-old boy died Friday night after becoming tangled in chains on a swing at a park in Northwest Jacksonville, deputies said.

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Jacksonville sheriff's deputies responded at 6:15 p.m. to Charles "Boobie" Clark Park where they found the unresponsive boy, who investigators identified as NaShon Green.

Earlier, NaShon's mother walked with NaShon and her other three kids -- ages 9, 6 and 4 -- to play at the park. NaShon was standing on the swing, police said.

When the mother looked back at the boy, she saw the swing’s chains wrapped around his neck. She took him down from the swing and called 911.

NaShon was taken to UF Health Jacksonville, where he died of his injuries. 

The child's mother and other children are being questioned, but police said no foul play is suspected and the incident is being called a tragic accident by JSO.

Florida man covered in facial tattoos arrested in car theft, police say

Marion County deputies, with the help of their K-9, helped find a car theft suspect covered in facial tattoos who was sought by Putnam County authorities, investigators said.

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Deputies said they noticed a stolen 2005 Hyundai Saturday as it pulled into the parking lot of the Queens Garden Resort in Ocala.

Robert Wade Hardister, 26, got out of the car and ran, deputies said. 

Deputy Matthew Hooper said he and K-9 Ramo tracked Hardister down, at which point Hardister surrendered to deputies without incident.

Hardister was arrested and charged with grand theft auto.

Photos: Notable deaths 2017

Documents: Montana congressman misled investigators after assaulting reporter

A Montana congressman misled investigators about his assault on a reporter the day before he was elected in May, claiming that “liberal media” were “trying to make a story,” the Bozeman Daily Chronicle reported Saturday, citing audio and documents.

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U.S. Rep. Greg Gianforte, a Republican, told an officer in an audio interview after the attack that reporter Ben Jacobs of The Guardian newspaper had grabbed him by the wrist and pulled both of them to the floor.

Audio of Gianforte’s interview with Gallatin County Sheriff’s Office Sgt. Scott Secor was released along with documents requested by the Chronicle and other news organizations after Gianforte was cited for assaulting Jacobs on May 24.

Gianforte later pleaded guilty to misdemeanor assault. 

The Chronicle requested the documents in June. After Gianforte, Jacobs and Gallatin County Attorney Marty Lambert did not object to the release, Gallatin County District Court Judge Holly Brown ruled this week that the documents could be released.

\The audio of the interview with Gianforte comes from a recording made by Sgt. Scott Secor outside of Gianforte’s headquarters shortly after the 5:07 p.m. call Jacobs made to 911, a minute after he posted on Twitter, “Greg Gianforte just body slammed me and broke my glasses.”

Once at the scene, Secor spoke with Jacobs first. “This is the weirdest day,” Jacobs told Secor. 

The documents include interviews with members of a Fox News crew who were in the room with Gianforte and Jacobs at the politician’s Bozeman campaign office. 

Gianforte told Secor that he was preparing for an interview with Fox News when “this man broke into a private room in the back and stuck a microphone in my face and started asking me obnoxious questions.”

Gianforte said he tried to explain to him that he was in the middle of an interview, but that Jacobs kept “waving” the microphone in his face, the Chronicle reported.

“I probably shouldn’t do it but I reached out for his phone ... he grabbed my wrist, he spun and we ended up on the floor ... so he pulled me down on top of him,” Secor quoted Gianforte as saying.

After the incident Gianforte’s campaign spokesman, Shane Scanlon, issued a statement that also blamed the attack on Jacobs, saying the reporter had grabbed the candidate’s wrist. 

Gianforte publicly apologized to Jacobs and told supporters he wasn’t proud of his actions. His spokesman, Travis Hall, insisted on Friday that the documents contained “nothing new.”

“No one was misled, and anyone who says otherwise is mistaken. Greg took responsibility for his actions and is focused on serving the people of Montana,” Hall said in an emailed statement to The Associated Press.

LaVar Ball minimizes Trump's role in getting UCLA players released

LaVar Ball downplayed President Donald Trump’s role in having his son and two other UCLA basketball players released from custody after a shoplifting incident in China, ESPN reported.

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“Who? What was (Trump) over there for? Don’t tell me nothing,” Ball told ESPN. “Everybody wants to make it seem like he helped me out.”

LiAngelo Ball, Jalen Hill and Cody Riley had been detained in China for the past week on suspicion of shoplifting. The three players returned to Los Angeles on Tuesday and were indefinitely suspended by the team.

Trump, who returned from Asia late Tuesday, said he raised the question of releasing the players when he spoke with China’s president, Xi Jinping, during a trip to Beijing last week, ESPN reported.

The players were questioned about allegedly stealing from three stores in Hangzhou, including sunglasses from a Louis Vuitton store next to the team’s hotel. They were released on bail on Nov. 8, ESPN reported.

"As long as my boy's back here, I'm fine," Ball told ESPN. "I'm happy with how things were handled. A lot of people like to say a lot of things that they thought happened over there. Like I told him, 'They try to make a big deal out of nothing sometimes.' I'm from L.A. I've seen a lot worse things happen than a guy taking some glasses. 

“Everybody gets stuck on the negativity of some things and they get stuck on them too long. That's not me. I handle what's going on and then we go from there.”

AC/DC co-founder Malcolm Young dead at 64

Rhythm guitarist Malcolm Young, the co-founder of the rock ’n’ roll group AC/DC, died Saturday, Rolling Stone reported and the band announced on its website. He was 64.

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Young had been suffering from dementia for the past three years, which forced his retirement from the band that he founded with his brother Angus Young in 1973.

"Today it is with deep heartfelt sadness that AC/DC has to announce the passing of Malcolm Young," AC/DC wrote on its site. “Malcolm, along with Angus, was the founder and creator of AC/DC. With enormous dedication and commitment he was the driving force behind the band. As a guitarist, songwriter and visionary he was a perfectionist and a unique man. He always stuck to his guns and did and said exactly what he wanted. He took great pride in all that he endeavored. His loyalty to the fans was unsurpassed.”

Angus Young added, "As his brother it is hard to express in words what he has meant to me during my life, the bond we had was unique and very special. He leaves behind an enormous legacy that will live on forever. Malcolm, job well done.”

The Young brothers lost their older brother, George Young, who was the band’s longtime producer and a guitarist for the Easybeats, on Oct. 23. George Young was 70 when he died.

>> AC/DC producer, Easybeats guitarist George Young dead at 70

In a statement to Australia's SBS, the band said that Malcolm Young died peacefully Saturday with his family by his side.

“Renowned for his musical prowess, Malcolm was a songwriter, guitarist, performer, producer and visionary who inspired many,” the statement said. “From the outset, he knew what he wanted to achieve and, along with his younger brother, took to the world stage giving their all at every show. Nothing less would do for their fans.”

Malcolm Young was last featured on the band's Black Ice tour, which ran from 2008 to 2010 and is the fourth-highest grossing tour of all time, SBS reported.

Malcolm Young, like his older brother George and younger brother Angus, was born in Glasgow, Scotland before the whole Young family emigrated to Sydney, Australia in the early 1960s, Rolling Stone reported.

Malcolm and Angus named the band after the “AC/DC” electrical current marker that they observed on their sisters sewing machine, Rolling Stone reported.

The brothers were the creative forces behind hits like “Highway to Hell,” “Back in Black,” “Highway to Hell,” “Thunderstruck,” “You Shook Me All Night Long,” and “For Those About to Rock (We Salute You).”

Megadeth’s Dave Mustaine tweeted that he was “losing it that Malcolm is gone,  I hate this.”

David Coverdale of Whitesnake tweeted that Young was “a great guy” and “a pleasure to know.”

“Truly missed,” he added.

The Young brothers and AC/DC were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2003, Rolling Stone reported. The band sold more than 110 million albums worldwide.

In September 2014 the band said Malcolm Young had left the group because of the onset of dementia, The Guardian reported.

In November 2014, Angus Young told The Guardian that his brother had developed symptoms when the group recorded the “Black Ice” album in 2008, and that he had to relearn songs between shows.

“It was hard work for him,” Angus Young said. “He was relearning a lot of those songs that he knew backwards; the ones we were playing that night he’d be relearning.”

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