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8-year-old football players kneel during national anthem in protest

Every player from an 8-and-under football team in Belleville, Illinois, took a knee in protest during the national anthem before their game on Saturday, according to KTVI.

>> Watch the news report here

“One of the kids asked me if I saw (people) protesting and rioting in St. Louis. I said yes; I said, ‘Do you know why they are doing it?'” said Coach Orlando Gooden during a phone interview with the news station on Tuesday.

>> See a photo of the protest here

Gooden told the news station that one of the players responded, “Because black people are getting killed and nobody’s going to jail.”

Gooden, a former football player at the University of Missouri, said his players were aware of the recent Jason Stockley decision, which saw an ex-St. Louis officer acquitted in a fatal shooting of a black driver and led to numerous protests.

>> Elderly woman knocked to ground by police during St. Louis protest

“I felt like it was a good teaching moment for me to circle the team and have a meeting,” he said.

Gooden said he spoke with his team about that and other situations that have taken place recently in the United States and explained why free agent quarterback Colin Kaepernick and others have knelt during the anthem in protest.

>> Read more trending news

“One of the kids asked, ‘Can we do that?’ I said, ‘As long as we know why we’re doing it, I don’t have a problem with any of it,'” he said.

According to the coach, the third-graders immediately took a knee as the anthem began, with their backs — unintentionally — away from the flag.

“What I teach my kids is love, integrity, honesty, fairness, respect and boundaries,” he said.

The players’ parents reportedly supported the coach’s decision to allow the team to take a knee; however, a Facebook post from his wife reveals that there has been some backlash from other residents in the area.

“As long as I have support of my parents and team, I’m perfectly fine, and I’m covered under the First Amendment to peacefully protest and assemble,” Gooden said.

Hurricane Maria: Live updates

Hurricane Maria is bearing down on the Caribbean and is set to pass over much the same area devastated by Hurricane Irma nearly two weeks ago.

>> Read more trending news 

Doctor realizes she's going into labor after delivering patient's baby

In the early morning hours of July 28, Dr. Emily Jacobs noticed that her own water had broken just after delivering a third baby during her shift -- taking her from the role of doctor to patient.

>> Read more trending news

"I noticed what I thought was amniotic fluid of the patient as the baby was delivering. It wasn't until I left the room when I realized that it was my water that had broken,"  Jacobs told ABC News.

Jacobs described the shock to the Iowa City Press-Citizen:

“It’s funny how fast you go from being a doctor to a patient — and you’re freaking out. One minute you are in control, and then the next, you’re not.”

Ryan, Emily’s husband, got the call around 4:45 a.m. and joined her at the hospital.

Hours later, The Jacobses welcomed  their new son, Jett Jacobs.

Read more at the Iowa City Press-Citizen here.

These are the 'Most Dangerous' celebrities on the internet, according to a new survey

What do Avril Lavigne, Bruno Mars, Beyonce, Sean “P. Diddy” Combs and Katy Perry have in common? Besides fame, that is?

>> Read more trending news

They’re “dangerous” online — at least according to McAfee, the cybersecurity company, who tracks and ranks celebrities based on the search results for their name. Using Google, Bing and Yahoo search results, the company checks how many sites list results for individual celebrities and how many of those sites are likely to infect your computer.

Celebrity news, the company says, is a common front for sites planning on installing malware or otherwise compromising your computer and/or information. McAfee has ranked celebrities this way since 2008; the first celebrity to hold the title of “most dangerous” was Brad Pitt.

This year, the top of the list is Canadian pop princess Avril Lavigne, according to the new rankings. Over 14 percent of pages with her name on it also contain a threat of some sort; that number comes closer to 25 percent when “free mp3” is added to the search.

Bruno Mars and Carly Rae Jepsen are No. 2 and No. 3, followed by Zayn Malik, Celine Dion, Calvin Harris, Justin Beiber, Sean Combs, Katy Perry and Beyonce.

Mother speaks out after her children are barred from school after principal denies their residency

Four children have been barred from a Memphis, Tennessee, school after its principal denies their residency.

For nearly two weeks, Erica Smith, the mother of those children, says she has fought to get them re-enrolled in Snowden School since they were barred from attending by Principal Jamie Stallsmith Sept. 8.

>> Read more trending news

Over a week later, Smith is facing a subpoena from Shelby County sheriff for truancy. Smith said she has tried to prove to Shelby County Schools that she does live in the district.

“People sleep outside for a chance to get their kids to go to an optional school, and you mean to tell me that I stay in the district and I’m allowed to get them in optional school for free? If you don't think I want that opportunity? Of course I do,” Smith said.

An optional school has specialized learning focuses that range from college prep, international studies, international baccalaureate, creative and performing arts, health science and others, according to the Shelby County Schools website.

Smith found out her children had been kicked out of Snowden School weeks ago.

“Originally, my children were kicked out of school due to a residency issue,” Smith said. “The principal was stating that we were not staying where I told them that we stayed.”

After she met all of the requirements for proof of residency, her kids were still not allowed back into school. Then Smith said she was told by Stallsmith that her 6-year-old had a behavioral issue. She agrees he does, but he has never been violent.

“He hasn’t hit anybody or put his hands on anybody.”

Shelby County School District responded to the issue in an email to Smith.

“It has come to our attention that school leaders spoke with the family earlier today and the students will be allowed to attend Snowden,” the email said. 

Smith said she believes there seems to be a disconnect between the school district and Stallsmith.

Smith said she took her children to school, but the principal had them leave.

“She puts us out of the school telling us that she wants to talk to them before she re-enrolled us, and then she prolongs it another day,” Smith said. “Yesterday she threatened to call the police if I didn't get off the property.”

Smith said she plans on taking her children back to Snowden School on Wednesday morning to re-enroll them.

Video of Russian helicopter firing on wrong target raises big questions

Alarming video from Russia’s Zapad 2017 exercise, a joint military exercise between Russia and Belarus, shows a Ka-52 helicopter firing on an area where people were clearly expecting a flyover, not flying missiles.

>> Read more trending news

The video has sparked competing versions of the story, one from those on the ground and one from the Russian Defense Ministry.

According to the Moscow Times, citing 66.ru’s anonymous source, one version of the story is that a technical glitch caused the missiles to blast off “on their own,” blowing up two cars and seriously injuring two people, “most likely journalists.”

The 66.ru video, slightly more zoomed out and capturing the shaken reaction of the recorder, has been viewed more than 500,000 times.

The Russian Defense Ministry, on the other hand, said that people making a big deal about this on the internet are either stupid or liars.

“[A]ll social media messages about ’rounds on a crowd of journalists,’ ‘a large number of seriously wounded’ are either a deliberate provocation or someone’s personal stupidity,” the ministry said in a statement. “[Video footage] recorded an event that occurred at another time, when army aviation helicopter crews practiced ground attacks as part of a tactical exercise.”

While the Defense Ministry acknowledged that a helicopter fired on the wrong target and destroyed a truck, it said no one on the ground was hurt.

Russian President Vladimir Putin personally oversaw the Zapad war games.

As the British newspaper Guardian reported, Zapad means “west” in Russian and is “the reincarnation of a Soviet-era training exercise that involved Warsaw Pact countries […] carried out every four years.”

'The Little Couple’s' former Texas home is for sale

Jen and Bill Arnold’s former Houston home is on the market.

>> Read more trending news

The diminutive TLC stars and former Houston residents have listed their custom home, which was recently retrofitted to normal scale. The couple and their two kids moved to Florida over the summer due to a new job opportunity for Jen.

The home, which was tailored to the Arnolds’ stature, is listed for just under $1.23 million. It is approximately 3,600 square feet with four bedrooms.

Not far from NRG Park, it has a first-floor master suite, a media room, a study, a resort-style pool and spa, and a wine grotto.

Fortunately for any interested homebuyer, and the Arnolds, it escaped unscathed from neighborhood flooding despite the property’s flood-prone location.

Today’s teens drink, date less than ‘70s counterparts, study says

Teenagers aren’t in a rush to grow up. They’re not as interested in dating, snagging jobs or driving, according to a new academic study. 

Researchers from San Diego State University and Bryn Mawr College conducted a study, released Tuesday, to determine how soon adolescents engage in adult activities. 

To do so, they compared teenagers from the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s with teens from today, using surveys that questioned more than 8 million children, ages 13 to 19, from 1976 to 2016. The poll focused on topics including sex, alcohol and part-time jobs, and it also factored in race, region and gender. 

>> Read more trending news

After analyzing the results, they found that teens were not having sex, drinking or holding jobs nearly as much as those from 20 years ago. 

Among eighth-graders, only about half of them had held down a job or tried alcohol, compared with those in the ‘90s. As for older teens or those in the 12th grade, the number of youth getting their driver’s license, working, drinking and dating was down nearly 20 percent, compared with those from 40 years ago. 

“The developmental trajectory of adolescence has slowed, with teens growing up more slowly than they used to,” Jean M. Twenge, lead author of the study and professor of psychology at San Diego State University, said in a Tuesday news release. “In terms of adult activities, 18-year-olds now look like 15-year-olds once did.”

While researchers could not pinpoint why minors engage in fewer adult activities, they say homework or extracurricular activities were not a factor as those activities had decreased among eighth-and 12th-graders and was steady for 12th-graders and college students. 

However, they believe their findings, which were published in Society for Research in Child Development’s bimonthly journal, could be associated with increased internet and social media usage.

“Our study suggests that teens today are taking longer to embrace both adult responsibilities (such as driving and working) and adult pleasures (such as sex and alcohol),” said Heejung Park, study co-author and assistant professor of psychology at Bryn Mawr. “These trends are neither good nor bad, but reflect the current U.S. cultural climate.”

Teen returns lost wallet with $1,500 stuffed inside and it was all caught on camera

A big hug for a California teenager who found a wallet with $1,500 inside and returned it to its rightful owner.

That’s what Melissa Vang did when 18-year-old Tyler Opdyke showed up at her door to make sure she had found the lost wallet. He had hidden it under her doormat when no one answered his knock.

>> Read more trending news

This is how it happened. Opdyke was handing out fliers for his uncle’s pesticide business, according to KOVR, when he stumbled upon the wallet bulging with cash. 

Vang’s husband had dropped it as he was leaving the home

“I just really thought about what I would want someone to do if I were to drop my wallet,” Opdyke told KOVR. “And then I thought about the house. I thought about the family who lived there.”

When he rang the doorbell to return the wallet, no one answered, because Vang was afraid to go to the door, but surveillance video captured Opdyke holding up the wallet .

>> Related: Lost wallet returned with painfully honest letter about why thief kept cash

So he hid the wallet under the doormat and returned later to make sure the family had found it. This time Vang and her two daughters answered the door. They hugged Opdyke and thanked him for his honesty and integrity in returning the lost money.

What is storm surge and why is it dangerous?

What is storm surge, how does it happen and why should you be wary of it? Here is a quick look at storm surge.

What is storm surge?

A storm surge is water pushed inland as a hurricane advances and makes landfall.

How does it form?

Imagine a bowl of water. Put your hand in the middle of the bowl and cup it. Now slowly push your hand toward the edge of the bowl. Those are the same dynamics as storm surge. The ocean water is pushed by winds and waves, and is also sucked into the air near the eye of the hurricane by low pressure.

Is it a “wall of water” that rushes in?

Rarely. It is usually a rise of water that can happen quickly, moving at the same rate as the forward speed of a hurricane. 

How powerful is a storm surge?

Very powerful. Only 1 cubic yard of sea water weighs 1,728 pounds. A 6-inch surge can knock a person down.

How dangerous is it?

Storm surge kills more people in a hurricane than all other components of the storm. The overwhelming majority of deaths in the 10 deadliest U.S. landfalling hurricanes were the result of storm surge.

How can I stay safe?

Get away from it. A surge 1 foot deep can take a car off a road. Get out early, because the surge can begin up to 24 hours before landfall. During Hurricane Katrina, people stayed in their homes and died there when the surge filled their homes with water and they could not escape. Also, don’t leave pets at home. Many animals died when people left them in their homes during Hurricane Katrina.

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