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Dry conditions could mean more venomous snake sightings, experts say

The ongoing drought could bring danger slithering right into Floridians' yards.

The dry conditions mean the most venomous snakes in Central Florida are on the move.

>> Watch the news report here

Herpetologist Bob Cross said low water levels in many lakes and swamps means snake sightings are more likely to happen in neighborhoods.

“It’s very frightening to think that they’re that they’re that close to a house,” said Longwood resident Candy Bauer. "I don't feel the same about my backyard."

>> Snakes dumped in Walmart parking lot

She found a cottonmouth in her backyard this week and called Cross to relocate the animal.

“Usually when people saw that, it’s a harmless water snake," Cross said. "But in this case, the lady was right."

>> Read more trending news

He said the dry weather is forcing the cottonmouths and other snakes to seek water elsewhere.

"He’s going to be traveling like the gators,” Cross said.

>> 'Firefighters saved my life,' rattlesnake victim says

He said a bite from a cottonmouth would cause severe pain and swelling.

"We'd be calling 911 and a helicopter for you," Cross said.

The snake found in Bauer’s yard will be sent to a facility in DeLand which will use it to produce anti-venom.

Donald Trump's childhood home sells for 'yuge' profit

A real estate prospector just profited big-league from the sale of President Donald Trump's childhood home.

>> PHOTOS: Donald Trump’s childhood home

According to CNN, the 2,500-square-foot New York Tudor has a new owner just three months after Michael Davis bought the property in Queens' Jamaica Estates neighborhood for $1.4 million. Last week, an unnamed bidder reportedly shelled out $2.14 million for the home where Trump lived until he was about 4.

>> PREVIOUS STORY: Donald Trump's childhood home goes on auction block

The house, built by Trump's father, Fred Trump, has "a brick and stucco exterior and an old-world charm interior featuring arched doorways, hardwood floors, five bedrooms, 4 1/2 baths, library, living room with fireplace, formal dining room, basement and more," Paramount Realty USA said in the listing.

>> Read more trending news

Read more here or here.

Girl tells teacher about weed her dad grows in the backyard

Kids say the darndest things.

>> Read more trending stories  

Dax Holt, a former producer at TMZ, recorded a conversation he had with his daughter, Skylar, about an awkward exchange he had with her teacher.

“When I got to your school, your teacher said, ‘I heard you have a lot of weed at your house,'” Holt told Skylar. “Are we growing weed at our house?”

“Yeah,” said Skylar.

“A lot of it?” asks Holt, to which Skylar responds, “Yeah, just a little bit, but it’s going to grow a lot.”

“Do you want to show people what you’re talking about?” Holt asks.

Skylar then leads him to the backyard to point out the “weed.”

Watch the video below:

My child's teacher: "so Skylar tells me you guys have a ton of weed at home."Me: "umm"Teacher: "she said you're growing it"Me:Posted by Dax Holt on Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Orkin releases list of cities with most bedbugs

WSOCTV.com contributed to this report.

new report released Wednesday morning names Baltimore as the city with the most bedbugs in the country.

>> Read more trending stories  

The Maryland city moved up nine spots from its ranking last year. 

Washington, D.C., Chicago, New York City and Columbus, Ohio, rounded out the top five.

Atlanta (No. 16); Charlotte, North Carolina (No. 19); Boston (No. 28); Dayton, Ohio (No. 32); Seattle (No. 34); Orlando (No. 44); and Miami (No. 46) made the top 50.

The cities were ranked based on treatment data from the metro areas where Orkin performed the most bedbug treatments from Dec. 1, 2015, to Nov. 30, 2016.

"We have more people affected by bedbugs in the United States now than ever before," Orkin entomologist and director of technical services Ron Harrison said. "They were virtually unheard of in the U.S. 10 years ago."

Orkin calls bedbugs "hitchhikers" that travel from place to place.

Orkin officials think bedbugs have become prevalent because they've built up a resistance to chemicals.

They also said you might not know you have bedbugs because many people don't have a physical reaction to the insect's bites.

See the full list and read more at Orkin

Website can tell you if anyone died in your home

It's easier than ever to find out if there's a ghost in your home, thanks to DiedinHouse.com.

>> Read more trending stories  

For $11.99, the website searches records and news reports for information about specific U.S addresses.

To sign up, all you have to do is create an account and include your address. 

Along with information about whether anyone has died in your home, the website offers a wealth of information to piece together the history of any potential deaths, including: 

  • Deaths at the address
  • Names of people involved
  • The statuses of people involved
  • The cause of death (if available)
  • Any methamphetamine activity
  • Reported fires

In Massachusetts alone, there have been over 1,000 reported cases on DiedInHouse.com.

You can also look up famous addresses. The website gives an example report of musician Kurt Cobain's Seattle home.

Whether you want some peace of mind or you are the ghost hunter type, DiedinHouse.com can give you a little more insight into your home's past. 

SolarCity wants 'solar shingles' on 5 million more roofs

SolarCity wants to persuade 5 million American households to replace their roofs with solar-energy shingles.

Instead of installing panels on top of an existing roof, the company is working on "solar shingles" that would replace a home's roof and absorb solar energy.

>> Read more trending stories  

About 1 million Americans have solar panels on their homes, so adding an additional 5 million to that list would be quite the accomplishment.

But the company seems to think the solar shingles can fix some of the biggest problems associated with solar energy.

Elon Musk, the company's chairman, said the solar roofing looks better and lasts longer than normal roofing.

And Musk said installing or replacing the solar shingles shouldn't be much different than when it is for those who use regular roofing materials.

But the company will still need to keep costs down if it wants to see mainstream adoption.

The Dow Chemical Company recently had to discontinue its line of solar shingles because the product wasn't selling -- likely because they were more expensive and less efficient than typical solar panels.

SolarCity isn't talking about the price or energy output of its shingles yet.

Right now, it's in the middle of a merger with Tesla Motors, which could open up the option to package the solar shingles with Tesla products such as the home battery. That could make the adoption process for solar roofing easier and cheaper.

Photos: Playboy Mansion sold for $100 million

Cucamelon: 5 things to know about the cute fruit

A little-known fruit is making headlines this summer for its big flavor.

Here's what you need to know about cucamelons:

1. What is a cucamelon? According to the Huffington Post, the cucamelon is a fruit that looks like a tiny watermelon but tastes more like a lime-dipped cucumber. It's also known as Mexican sour gherkin, Mexican miniature watermelon, Mexican sour cucumber and mouse melon, BuzzFeed reports.

2. Where do cucamelons grow? Cucamelons originated in Mexico and Central America, BuzzFeed reports. The fruit, which is about the size of a grape, grows on a vine.

>> Read more trending stories

3. Where can I get them? They are sold at some farmer's markets, but your best bet is to grow them yourself, the Huffington Post reports. You can buy seeds online here.

4. How do I grow them? According to Home-Grown Revolution, you should "sow the seed from April to May indoors and plant out when all risk of frost is over." The vine will also need a support or trellis to grown on, SF Gate reports. Learn more here or here.

5. What's the best way to eat them? The Huffington Post recommends eating cucamelons straight from the vine, adding them to salads, pickling them or using them to garnish cocktails.

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