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Justin Bieber banned in Beijing

Pop singer Justin Bieber is now banned in Beijing.

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Bieber won’t be performing in the Chinese capital due to “bad behavior,” according to a statement from the Beijing Municipal Bureau of Culture.

“His series of misbehaviors while living abroad and during his performances in China has caused public resentment,” said the statement, which was dated July 18. “To regulate the domestic entertainment market and purify its environment, we find it inappropriate to bring in performers with bad behaviors.”

The 23-year-old Canadian is currently on a world tour, CNN reported.  He has dates scheduled in Japan, the Philippines, India, Singapore and Indonesia. Bieber’s website does list a show in Hong Kong on Sept. 27. It does not show any scheduled dates for mainland China.

Bieber joins a list of musicians allegedly blacklisted by China, CNN reported, including Lady Gaga, Selena Gomez, Linkin Park, Bjork, Bon Jovi and Maroon 5.

Exhumation of Dali's remains finds his mustache still intact

Forensic experts in Spain have removed hair, nails and two long bones from Salvador Dali's embalmed remains to find genetic samples for a paternity test — a move that opens the possibility for a woman who says she is the surrealist artist's daughter to claim part of the Dali estate.

Officials said Friday that the artist's mummified remains were so well conserved that even his famous mustache had survived the passing of time and remained in "its classic shape of ten past ten," referring to the positions of the hands on a clock.

Dali was buried in the Dali Museum Theater in the northeastern Spanish town of Figueres, his birthplace, when he died at 84 years old in 1989. The exhumation followed longstanding claims by Pilar Abel, a 61-year-old tarot card reader, who says her mother had an affair with Dali in the town.

In June, a Madrid judge finally ruled that a DNA test should be performed to find out whether her allegations were true.

Forensic experts opened the artist's coffin Thursday night in a sensitive operation that involved using pulleys to lift a 1.5-ton stone slab.

Lluis Penuelas Reixach, the secretary general of the Gala Dali Foundation, said Dali's remains — including his mustache — are well conserved, mummified after the embalming process applied 27 years ago. He was speaking to reporters Friday during a press conference in Figueres.

According to judicial authorities, only five people —a judge, three coroners and an assistant— were allowed to oversee the removal of the samples out of respect for the remains and in order to avoid any contamination.

Representatives of the foundation managing Dali's estate said Friday the evidence backing Abel's claims weren't enough to justify the intrusive exhumation, and that it will continue a legal battle to nullify the paternity test.

Dali and his Russian wife Gala —whose birth name was Elena Ivanovna Diakonova — had no children of their own, although Gala had a daughter from an earlier marriage to French poet Paul Eluard. .

Abel, who for a while made her living by reading tarot cards on local television, was born in Girona, a city close to Figueres. She has fought for the exhumation because she wants legal proof that the artist was her biological father after an alleged affair between her mother and Dali.

If proved right, she could claim one fourth of the painter's estate which is now in the hands of a public foundation, according to her lawyer Enrique Blanquez. There are no current estimates of the value of that fortune.

If she is proved wrong, the Dali foundation will seek financial compensation for the costs of the exhumation.

Either way, minimizing the disruption to the museum's operations and to the rest of Dali's remains is the priority for the foundation managing Dali's estate, according to its secretary. "It's important for Salvador Dali to be returned to rest in the interior of his museum's dome," Penuelas said.

During a press conference this week, Abel explained how her mother and grandmother told the family secret when Abel was still young. Years later, she said she asked her mother again, who confirmed to her the story was true.

The foundation and the museum in Figueres took steps to make sure no images of the exhumation may emerge in public. Before work in the crypt began on Thursday, mobile phones were put in a deposit and a marquee was installed under the museum's glass dome to prevent any photography or video from drones.

The biological samples will travel to a forensic laboratory in Madrid for analysis, a process that could take weeks.

Bennington's death mirrors that of close friend Cornell

The death of Linkin Park frontman Chester Bennington came as a surprise to the world when it was announced, but it also struck similarities to the death of fellow rocker and close friend Chris Cornell, who killed himself in May.

Authorities are investigating Bennington's death as an apparent suicide, Los Angeles County coroner spokesman Brian Elias said Thursday. Bennington, who was 41, was found dead in his home near Los Angeles. He had a strong bond with Cornell and died on what would have been the Soundgarden singer's 53rd birthday.

Bennington was also the godfather to Cornell's 11-year-old son, Chris. And Bennington sang Leonard Cohen's "Hallelujah" at Cornell's memorial.

The Cornells called Bennington a member of their family in a statement released Thursday.

"The Cornell family is overwhelmed by the heartbreaking news about Chester Bennington which tragically comes so soon after their family's own loss," said a Cornell family spokesperson. "They open up their loving arms to Chester's family and share in the sorrow with all those who loved him."

Cornell died by hanging after a concert in Detroit. Linkin Park was set to go on tour next week.

Bennington helped Linkin Park, whose sound mixed rap and rock, become one of the most commercially successful acts in the 2000s. The Grammy-winning group sold more than 10 million copies of their 2000 debut, "Hybrid Theory," which featured the megahit and anthem, "In the End." They sold another 6 million with 2003's multiplatinum "Meteora." Both albums explored feelings of frustration and fury.

The success helped Linkin Park become Billboard's No. 1 act of the decade for rock songs and alternative songs.

Band co-founder and producer Mike Shinoda said on Twitter he was "shocked and saddened."

"Chester Bennington was an artist of extraordinary talent and charisma, and a human being with a huge heart and a caring soul. Our thoughts and prayers are with his beautiful family, his band-mates and his many friends," Warner Bros. Records CEO and Chairman Cameron Stang said in a statement.

Bennington's voice could soar with piercing strength or descend to a whisper. Rolling Stone once called it a "shrapnel-laced howl that sounds like it comes from someone twice his size."

The band also sold millions with its remix album, "Reanimation," and its mash-up record with Jay-Z, "Collision Course." They won Grammys for best hard rock performance in 2001 for "Crawling" and best rap/sung collaboration for "Numb/Encore" in 2005. Linkin Park was next scheduled to perform next week in Massachusetts and New York.

Bennington struggled with drug and alcohol addictions at various times during his life. He said he had been sexually abused as a child and was homeless for months before the band found fame.

Linkin Park released their most recent album, "One More Light," in May. It was an album that divided critics and fans alike for its embrace of moody pop. One song on the album, "Heavy," opens with the words: "I don't like my mind right now."

Although the band had always experimented with different sounds, some claimed Linkin Park had sold out, which Bennington denied. "One More Light" became the band's fifth No. 1 album debut on the Billboard 200 albums chart.

"If you like the music, fantastic. If you don't like it, that's your opinion too. Fantastic. If you're saying we're doing what we're doing for a commercial or monetary reason, trying to make success out of some formula. then stab yourself in the face!" Bennington told NME magazine.

When he got his big break in 1999, Bennington was an assistant at a digital-services firm in Phoenix. A music executive sent him a demo from the band Xero, which needed a lead singer. (He had been recommended by his attorney.) Bennington wrote and recorded new vocals over the band's playing and sent the results back. He soon got the gig and the band then changed its named to Hybrid Theory, then Linkin Park.

Bennington told The Associated Press in 2010 that because of the sound the band is known for — fusing sounds from nu-metal, punk, rock, pop and hip-hop — it was virtually impossible to satisfy their many kinds of fans.

"We're making music for us, that we like. We're not making music for other people," he said. "We're not thinking, 'Let's make a pie-graph of all our fans and find out how many people fit in whatever category and then make the perfect album for them.' Like, that would be absolutely ridiculous."

Bennington was married to his second wife, Talinda, and is survived by six children.

_____

AP Entertainment Writers Mark Kennedy in New York and Anthony McCartney contributed to this report.

O.J. Simpson triumphant, others devastated as he gets parole

Barring any last-minute snafus, O.J. Simpson will walk out of prison a free man in about three months, having persuaded a Nevada parole board the bungled hotel-room heist he pulled nearly 10 years ago was a monumental error in judgment and one he will never repeat.

Although he still adamantly maintains he was trying to retrieve his personal property when he barged into a hotel room with five other men in September 2007, he acknowledged repeatedly Thursday that it was something he never should have done.

"I thought I was glad to get my stuff back, but it just wasn't worth it," he told the board. "It wasn't worth it, and I'm sorry."

After a nationally televised hearing that clearly revealed the public's fascination with Simpson continues, four parole commissioners voted unanimously to release him.

"Thank you, thank you, thank you," he said quietly as he buried his head on his chest with relief.

Then, as he was led down a hall and back to prison, the Hall of Fame athlete and 1995 murder defendant raised his hands over his head in a victory gesture and said: "Oh, God, oh!"

Some two hours earlier, Simpson, gray-haired but looking trimmer than he has in recent years, had walked stiffly into a small hearing room of the Lovelock Correctional Center in rural Nevada dressed in jeans, a light-blue prison-issue shirt and sneakers.

He chuckled as parole board chairwoman Connie Bisbee began the hearing by mistakenly giving his age at 90 before quickly correcting herself.

"Feels like it though," Simpson, 70, said as laughter erupted.

Bisbee and three other parole board commissioners were gathered in another hearing room about two hours away in Carson City, the state's capital. They questioned Simpson via video.

Several major TV networks and cable channels — including ABC, CBS, NBC, CNN, Fox, MSNBC and ESPN — carried the proceedings live, just as some of them did two decades ago during a famous Ford Bronco chase over Southern California freeways that ended in Simpson's arrest and again when a jury in his murder trial returned with its not guilty verdict.

During Thursday's hearing, the charisma and charm that once made Simpson one of the most popular figures in American pop culture was clearly on display.

By turns remorseful, jovial and defensive, he heatedly insisted the items he and five others took during the armed robbery in a Las Vegas hotel room in September 2007 were "my stuff."

Asked what he planned to do if released, Simpson said he would move to Florida to be close to two of his four adult children.

"I could easily stay in Nevada, but I don't think you guys want me here," he joked.

At one point, he set off a storm of sarcasm and mockery on social media when, assuring commissioners he would stay out of trouble, he said: "I've basically spent a conflict-free life, you know."

He also insisted he never meant to hurt anyone during the 2007 confrontation, never pointed a gun and didn't make any threats during the holdup of two sports memorabilia dealers.

"These were friends of mine, actually guys who helped me move and store some of this stuff," he said of the dealers, Bruce Fromong and the late Alfred Beardsley.

Fromong testified that was true, adding it was one of the men accompanying Simpson who pointed a gun at him.

"He is a good man. He made a mistake," Fromong said of Simpson, adding that if Inmate No. 1027820 asks him for a ride from prison when he is released he will be there.

"I mean that," he said turning to face Simpson.

Simpson was widely expected to win parole, given similar cases and his good behavior behind bars. His defenders have argued, too, that his sentence was out of proportion to the crime and that he was being punished for the murders he was acquitted of in Los Angeles in 1995, the stabbings of ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ronald Goldman.

Arnelle Simpson, at 48 the eldest of Simpson's four children, told the board, "We recognize that he is not the perfect man." But she said he has been "a perfect inmate, following all the rules and making the best of the situation."

Simpson said he has spent his time in prison mentoring fellow inmates, often keeping them out of trouble, and that he has become a better person during those years.

"I've done my time. I've done it as well and respectfully as I think anybody can," he told the board.

Asked if he was confident he could stay out of trouble, he replied that he learned a lot from an alternative-to-violence course he took in prison and that in any case he has always gotten along well with people.

An electrifying running back dubbed "The Juice," Simpson won the Heisman Trophy as the nation's best college football player in 1968 and went on to become one of the NFL's all-time greats.

The handsome and charming athlete was also a "Monday Night Football" commentator, sprinted through airports in Hertz rental-car commercials and built a Hollywood career with roles in the "Naked Gun" comedies and other movies.

All of that came crashing down with his arrest in the 1994 slayings and his trial, a gavel-to-gavel live-TV sensation that transfixed viewers with its testimony about a bloody glove that didn't fit and stirred furious debate over racist police, celebrity justice and cameras in the courtroom.

Two years after his acquittal Simpson was found liable in civil court for the killings and ordered to pay $33.5 million to survivors, including his children and the Goldman family.

Last year, the case proved to be compelling TV all over again with the ESPN documentary "O.J.: Made in America" and the award-winning FX miniseries "The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story."

The long prison sentence that resulted from the hotel-room stickup brought a measure of satisfaction to some of those who thought Simpson got away with murder. Among them were Ron Goldman's sister, Kim, and their father, Fred.

"The Goldmans are devastated," family spokesman Michael Wright said of Thursday ruling.

___

Associated Press writers Scott Sonner in Carson City; John Rogers, John Antczak, Christopher Weber and Michael Balsamo in Los Angeles; and Terence Chea in Lovelock contributed to this report.

Disney building the world's first Marvel hotel

It’s a hotel that Disney is hoping guests will marvel at.

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Disney’s Hotel New York, a 565-room property near Disneyland Paris’ Disneytown. will be renovated to feature the props, drawings and costumes from Marvel films, television shows and comic books, Travel & Leisure reported.

The Art of Marvel will be the first Marvel Comics hotel. It will boast a skyscraper facade and likely will include Stark Tower, Travel & Leisure reported, continuing Marvel’s expanded presence among Disney properties. 

The Walt Disney Company acquired Marvel Entertainment in 2009, and has opened two attractions -- Guardians of the Galaxy, Mission Breakout! at Disney’s California Adventure; and Iron Man Experience at Hong Kong Disneyland. Walt Disney World’s Epcot park in Florida will be opening a Guardians of the Galaxy roller coaster soon, while Avengers attractions are being proposed for the Disney California Adventure park, Travel & Leisure reported.

Late 'Batman' actor Adam West honored at Comic-Con

There are typically a lot of Batmen at Comic-Con, but only one was the subject of a star-filled tribute.

Filmmaker Kevin Smith, producer James Tucker, actors Ralph Garman and Lee Meriwether and about a thousand fans paid tribute to the late Adam West at the pop-culture convention Thursday night.

West played Batman in the 1960s TV series and later voiced the character of Mayor West on "Family Guy." He died last month at age 88.

Smith said he was about 4 years old when he first saw West in "Batman" on a black-and-white TV.

"He defined my youth," Smith said. "He gave me my morality. Everything I learned about being good, I learned from watching Adam West play the Bright Knight."

Smith said that when he shared those thoughts with West during his appearance on the "Fatman on Batman" podcast, West said: "That doesn't speak well of your parents."

Meriwether said that when she played Catwoman and Kitka opposite West in "Batman: The Movie" movie, she could hardly maintain her character's accent because she was so dazzled by West.

"I had a little crush, just a little one," the 82-year-old actress said, blushing at the memory. One of the first scenes they filmed together was a ballroom scene where the two danced.

"All I could think of was, 'I'm dancing with Adam West,'" she said. "I probably blew one take and then I snapped out of it."

Tucker said the whole reason he became a producer is so that one day he might be able to hire, and therefore meet, West. The first time Tucker hired him, though, West literally phoned it in. It was a voice-acting role, and the actor was able to do it by phone.

"I didn't get to meet him, so I had to cast him again," Tucker said.

"Whatever I'm doing in this industry is because of that show," he said of seeing West on "Batman."

"That show changed my life. It made me want to do this. It made me want to be an artist," Tucker continued. "Meeting him and having him be exactly who you want him to be as a person... and be genuinely friendly and genuinely there for you is amazing. I can't say enough about him."

Garman, who does a perfect impression of West's voice, said he idolized the actor growing up. He started collecting Batman memorabilia as a kid and has been building on the collection ever since ("an enormous collection that my wife forces me to keep in one room"). He eventually worked with and befriended West and his family.

"I have a little piece of magic in my life because I got to become friends with my hero," Garman said. "I mean, when does that happen in most people's lives? I'm truly blessed."

The presentation included highlight reels of West's work on "Batman" and "Family Guy," along with outtakes from the 2013 documentary "Starring Adam West," which was directed by his son-in-law.

In those clips, West talks about meeting with fans and what he thinks his legacy might be.

"You know, I hear the word 'legacy' quite often. And other words like 'icon.' You can just call me icon, if you will," West says. "I don't know what the legacy would be, except the legacy of making people happy, and adding some kind of instructional influence in young lives. Maybe that's kind of a legacy."

___

AP Entertainment Writer Sandy Cohen is posting from Comic-Con at www.twitter.com/APSandy .

'Nashville' Season 5, Episode 19 Recap: Love and Loss

With only three episodes left in Season 5, it appears that the producers of 'Nashville' have plans to pack in as much drama as humanly possible.

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Celebrities react to death of Linkin Park singer Chester Bennington

The death of Linkin Park lead singer Chester Bennington has shocked fans and celebrities, and many are reacting on social media.

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Bennington died of a suicide at age 41, according to the Los Angeles County coroner.

The musician was on tour with his group promoting its latest album, “One More Light.” 

“Chester Bennington was an artist of extraordinary talent and charisma, and a human being with a huge heart and a caring soul. Our thoughts and prayers are with his beautiful family, his band-mates and his many friends,” Warner Bros. Records CEO and Chairman Cameron Stang said in a statement, according to The Associated Press.

Related: Linkin Park lead singer Chester Bennington dead of suicide

Bennington’s bandmates, past collaborators and other celebrities expressed thoughts and condolences about his death on social media.

Builder of illegal LA mansion gets fines, community service

The father of fashion models Bella and Gigi Hadid has been fined and given community service for illegally building a gigantic mansion in Los Angeles.

The Los Angeles Times reports (http://lat.ms/2ufqHY5 ) that real estate developer Mohamed Hadid was sentenced Thursday to 200 hours of service, fined $3,000 and ordered to pay the city more than $14,000 to cover building department costs.

Hadid pleaded no contest in May to misdemeanor charges for building portions of a 30,000-square-foot mansion in Bel Air without obtaining proper permits.

Authorities say bedrooms, decks, supporting walls and even an IMAX theater were built illegally. The city halted construction three years ago and the home remains unfinished.

Hadid's attorney, Robert Shapiro, said after sentencing that Hadid is interested in bringing the home into compliance and completing it.

R.L. Stine talks 'Goosebumps' at 1st San Diego Comic-Con

"Goosebumps" creator R.L. Stine got a surprise during his first trip to San Diego Comic-Con: The 73-year-old author received the organization's Inkpot Award, which recognizes contributions to the worlds of comics, fantasy and sci-fi. Past recipients include Steven Spielberg, Neil Gaiman and George Lucas.

"Everyone's being too nice to me," Stine said. "I'm not used to it. I don't get that at home."

Stine received the honor before appearing at a panel Thursday in which he told stories from throughout his career. He said he was initially reluctant to write scary stories for young readers, but once he came up with the name "Goosebumps," he decided to give it a try. He has now written 130 "Goosebumps" books.

Stine also announced Thursday that a new line of "Goosebumps" comic books is in the works, and that he's making his first foray into comics with a Marvel series called "Man Thing."

"This was like a life's dream," he said. "I'd always wanted to write comic books. I always loved comics, but I'd never written one."

Different authors will pen the "Goosebumps" comic books, spinning off characters from Stine's novels.

A sequel to the "Goosebumps" movie is also underway, Stine said, and Fox plans to adapt his "Fear Street" books into a series of films.

The author also shared several personal revelations. For example, despite having written 330 books, he never learned to type.

"I only use one finger. I don't even use two!" he said, showing his bent, bandaged finger to the crowd. "The finger goes, that's the career."

He said that his son, Matt, never read a "Goosebumps" book growing up, but used to sell parts in future volumes to his elementary school classmates. Stine obliged and wrote them in.

He said his favorite "Goosebumps" installment is "The Haunted Mask," which was inspired by his son's real-life experience of getting his head stuck in a rubber Frankenstein mask at Halloween.

Stine said she never struggles to find story ideas.

"I only try to think of titles and a title will lead me to the story," he said, adding that they often come to him while he's walking his dog.

Responding to audience questions, Stine revealed that his favorite scary movie is "Evil Dead 2" and his favorite Stephen King books are ""Misery" and "Pet Sematary."

"I think I stole that plot about four times," Stine said.

But horror movies don't scare him, he said.

His scariest experience ever was a real-life one: When he lost his young son at a New York car show.

"That was scary — that incredible feeling of panic," Stine said. "And I lost him for about 20 seconds, but it was horrible."

___

Follow AP Entertainment Writer Sandy Cohen at www.twitter.com/APSandy .

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